PECULIARITIES OF PHYSICAL GROWTH AND BODY COMPOSITION OF PRETERM INFANTS, RECEIVED DIFFERENT TYPES OF FEEDING, AT THE DISCHARGE FROM HOSPITAL

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Abstract


Background: This article is devoted to a research and practice problem — optimization of feeding preterm infants. Patients and methods: 80 preterm infants of different GA with perinatal pathology were included in the study group. Anthropometric figures of weight and length z-scores and also BMI of preterm infants, received different types of feedings, at the discharge are presented. All patients’ body composition (Fat free mass and Fat mass) was estimated by air plethysmography. Results: Less mass and length at the discharge in preterm infants, received breast feeding (including fortified milk), in comparison with the infants, received mixed and formula feeding, were found out. At the same time, preterm infants received breast feeding had more optimal body composition (less fat mass), than the infants received formula feeding. Conclusion: Personalised approach to human milk fortifiers prescription is explained. Important practical value of methodology for estimating body composition by air plethysmography is established.


I. A. Belyaeva

Scientific Centre of Children's Health, Moscow

Author for correspondence.
Email: irinaneo@mail.ru

Russian Federation

PhD, Head of the Department of Premature neonates of SCCH.  Address: build. 1, 2, Lomonosovskii Avenue, Moscow, RF, 119991; tel.: +7 (499) 134-15-19

L. S. Namazova-Baranova

Scientific Centre of Children's Health, Moscow, Russian Federation

Email: namazova@nczd.ru

Russian Federation correspondent member of RAS, Deputy Director for Science of SCCH, Director of RI of Preventive Pediatrics and Remedial Treatment of SCCH. Address: build. 1, 2, Lomonosovskii Avenue, Moscow, RF, 119991; tel.: +7 (499) 967-14-14

E. O. Tarzyan

Scientific Centre of Children's Health, Moscow, Russian Federation

Email: eleonora027@mail.ru

Russian Federation MD, research scientist of the Department of Premature neonates of SCCH. Address: build. 1, 2, Lomonosovskii Avenue, Moscow, RF, 119991; tel.: +7 (499) 134-15-19

V. A. Skvortsova

Scientific Centre of Children's Health, Moscow, Russian Federation

Email: vera.skvortsova@mail.ru

Russian Federation PhD, leading research scientist of the Department of Health and Ill Child Nutrition of SCCH. Address: build. 1, 2, Lomonosovskii Avenue, Moscow, RF, 119991; tel.: +7 (499) 132-25-02

I. A. Boldakova

Scientific Centre of Children's Health, Moscow, Russian Federation

Email: namazova@nczd.ru

Russian Federation

Boldakova Irina Andreevna, postgraduate of the Department of Premature neonates of SCCH. Address: build. 1, 2, Lomonosovskii Avenue, Moscow, RF, 119991; tel.: +7 (499) 134-15-19

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