PHYSICAL REHABILITATION IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS: GENERAL PRINCIPLES AND HIGH-TECH APPROACHES

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Abstract


In a chronic and disabling disease like multiple sclerosis, rehabilitation programs are of major importance for the preservation of physical, physiological, social and professional functioning and improvement of quality of life. Currently, it is generally assumed that physical activity is an important component of non-pharmacological rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis. Properly organized exercise is a safe and efficient way to induce improvements in a number of physiological functions. A multidisciplinary rehabilitative approach should be recommended. The main recommendations for the use of exercise for patients with multiple sclerosis have been listed. An important aspect of the modern physical rehabilitation in multiple sclerosis is the usage of high-tech methods. The published results of robot-assisted training to improve the hand function and walking impairment have been represented. An important trend in the rehabilitation of patients with multiple sclerosis is the reduction of postural disorders through training balance coordination. The role of transcranial magnetic stimulation in spasticity reducing is being investigated. The use of telemedicine capabilities is quite promising. Due to the fact that the decline in physical activity can lead to the deterioration of many aspects of physiological functions and, ultimately, to mobility decrease, further research of the role of physical rehabilitation as an important therapeutic approach in preventing the progression of disability in multiple sclerosis is required.

 


A. V. Peresedova

Research Center of Neurology of RAMS, Moscow, Russian Federation

Author for correspondence.
Email: neuro_inf@neurology.ru

Russian Federation PhD, senior research scientist of the VI Neurological department of the Federal State Budgetary Institution “Scientific Center of Neurology” of RAMS. Address: 80, Volokolamskoe Highway, Moscow, RF, 125367, tel.: (495) 490-44-45

L. A. Chernikova

Research Center of Neurology of RAMS, Moscow, Russian Federation

Email: in-phter@yandex.ru

Russian Federation PhD, professor, Head of the Neurorehabilitation and Physiotherapy department of the Federal State Budgetary Institution “Scientific Center of Neurology” of RAMS. Address: 80, Volokolamskoe Highway, Moscow, RF, 125367, tel.: (495) 490-25-02

I. A. Zavalishin

Research Center of Neurology of RAMS, Moscow, Russian Federation

Email: neuro_inf@neurology.ru

Russian Federation PhD, professor, head of the VI neurology department of the Federal State Budgetary Institution “Scientific Center of Neurology” of .RAMS. Address: 80, Volokolamskoe Highway, Moscow, RF, 125367, tel.: (495) 490-21-55

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